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Otescia Johnson

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer.

My career as an author began, if I’m totally honest, by accident. I was a fairly shy woman who accepted an invitation to speak to a small group of wives about my experience as a wife. I thought, sure I can do that. Right before I spoke, however, I felt this overwhelming urge to tell the story I’d never told. I told the story of my first marriage, the ugly truth of a relationship doomed before it ever started. It was a gripping, off the cuff speech I basically stumbled through. When I finished speaking, there wasn’t a dry eye in the room and I found myself surrounded by women who wanted advice and tools to help them navigate the rough patches of their lives. I was overwhelmed by all of the requests and had the brilliant idea to put all of my tips into a book. I thought I’d just give them the book and let them read at their leisure so I wouldn’t have to answer any more emails or phone calls. I had no clue how wrong I was. That first book only drew more attention and before long, strangers were emailing me from Wales, Germany, Canada, and more states than I can remember. (Marketing tip here: Always include your contact information in your book. You’d be surprised how many emails and website visits come from simply seeing the author’s contact information.) From there, the writing bug took over and I began to try my hand at fiction. I was laid off unexpectedly and decided that was as good a time as any to perfect my craft. I’ve been a lifelong reader and lover of language for as long as I can remember. I won my first creative writing contest in second grade. Pulling on those memories I wrote a novel loosely based on how my husband and I met. I received positive reviews, but it wasn’t a hit. It was basically low lying fruit. It didn’t require me to research or dig deeper into character development, story arc, or any of the things that make an average story a great story. It took me 6 books to discover my voice as an author and the style of writing that worked for me. Book number six was my first legal thriller, Adequate Counselor, and the characters haunted me night and day until I told their story. Adequate Counsel opened my eyes to the power of marketing. I connected with local attorneys, professors who taught law courses, social workers, teachers, book clubs and retirees who had a passion for reading. These individuals became my new target audience. I sent free copies of the book to book clubs for consideration to become their book of the month. I utilized Amazon’s free book promotion to bolster my eBook sales, which in turn opened me up to a whole new audience of readers. Two days of free promotions landed “Adequate Counsel” on multiple Amazon bestseller lists for six months. I took what I learned from the success of “Adequate Counsel”, fine tuned it, and began teaching other authors how to duplicate the system. As a result, B.O.Y. Publications was born.

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest struggles as a new author were not understanding how important marketing is to the success of a book, and mistaking social media posts as a marketing campaign. I didn’t know anything about mailing lists or how to nurture subscribers.

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

I’m almost embarrassed to say, it took me almost 18 months to understand why people were so emotionally attached to my fictional characters. When I understood what drew them to the characters, I began to understand my audience and how to communicate with them.

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

My favorite tools are social media (content sharing and ads), local media (morning shows, newspapers, indie magazines), and solid mailing list communication.

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Be creative. Marketing is not about being the one who talks the most. It’s about being the one who is saying something in a way the consumer has not heard before. Can you speak from a point of view your target audience seldom hears from? Can you share little known statistical data? Can you touch the pain point of your target audience with the first line of your sales copy? if you can do those things, you can sell anything.

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Legal Thrillers, Christian Nonfiction, African American Fiction, Relationships & Marriage, Self-Help

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would have started laying the foundation for my book six months prior to the release.

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

I am probably not the best person to answer this. (Does staying up until 6 am count as a system? lol ) One of the things I am a stickler about is writing everyday without exception. The only way to defeat writer’s block is to keep writing, even if what I wrote ends up being deleted, I am building muscle memory. My mind and overworked fingers know they must write for a minimum of one hour per day. This simple practice gives me a routine that helps me meet my deadlines. I have zero chance of meeting them if I do not stick to my writing schedule.

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer).

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

Four years from book 1 to book 6.

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I didn’t understand that publishing is a business and no business can be successful without marketing.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

The greatest question any writer can ever ask is, “What if?”

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

This may seem old school, but one of the ways I position a book is to research successful books in the author’s genre. I study keywords, sales page info, meta data, reader reviews, and anything else I can find on the top 10 books of the author’s genre. Then we create a plan to align the author’s book with those that are already successful.

What else would you like to share with readers?

I partner with authors to help them bring their book to market. We handle everything from concept to after publication marketing.

 

Shayla Raquel

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I’ve been in the publishing industry for ten years and have owned my own business for seven years. During this time, I’ve worked on hundreds of books and have launched best sellers for my clients. My services include: editing, coaching, self-publishing guidance, book marketing, book launches, web design, and writing mentorships. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

I had so many questions with little to no answers. Because I was on my own with my business in 2013, I didn’t have anyone I could shoot questions to. So I spent loads of time reading books and articles, watching videos and courses, and experimenting. I made lots of mistakes, but they always taught me something. In 2014, I became part of a group called 30 Days of Hustle by New York Times best-selling author Jon Acuff. Once I found my tribe, things really took off. Another struggle I dealt with was target marketing. In the beginning, my blog posts were geared toward editors, not new authors. I had no idea until I hired a brand marketer in late 2014. Once he made that clear for me, I was able to adjust my copywriting and position myself as someone who was there to help authors hold their books in their hands.

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

Honestly, probably 6 months after working with my brand marketer. But I think I’m always learning more about my target market. It evolves. Things change. People need different things, and you have to know their needs before they realize what they are. 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

These books: https://shaylaraquel.com/shaylas-picks My favorite newsletters that offer fantastic marketing advice are Reedsy, Jane Friedman’s The Hot Sheet, and Gary Vaynerchuk. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Practice authenticity first and foremost. It is the foundation of everything you will do when marketing your book and branding yourself as an author. If you aren’t yourself, then you’re wasting your time.

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

I work on fiction and nonfiction. It’s easier to list the books I don’t work on, which can be found here: https://shaylaraquel.com/faqs

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would’ve invested into a brand marketer way sooner. I put it off because of the cost. Looking back, I would’ve made more money if I had hired him. In fact, after hiring him, I had a 35% profit increase in one quarter.

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer). 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

That’s a loaded question. In reality, it probably took three years to see my company truly take off. In fact, three years after I started my business, I was able to buy my first house. No one likes that answer though because it sounds like it’ll take forever. Well, honey, I’m in it for the long game. 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

That’s tough. If you’re going to make me pick just one thing and nothing else, then I’ll say God’s grace.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given, than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.” Muhammad Ali

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

The best places to start are my blog, my #1 best-selling book, and my how-to videos: Blog: https://shaylaraquel.com/blog Book: https://shaylaraquel.com/10commandments How-to videos: https://shaylaraquel.com/howtovideos These are also some of my favorite books on writing, marketing, and the like: https://shaylaraquel.com/shaylas-picks For positioning your book, the only way you’re going to truly understand where your book will get the most visibility and engagement is to understand what problem your book solves and where people “hang out” with those problems. For example, if your book is targeted toward Gen X-ers who are reentering the workforce now that their kids are more grown up, get on LinkedIn and write helpful articles on the topic. If your book is targeted toward Millennials who want to get in shape, then post 1-minute videos on Instagram to teach them simple ways to improve their health. Solve their problems!

What else would you like to share with readers?

I teach workshops and am available here: https://shaylaraquel.com/speaking

 

Melissa Storm

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I write under my name plus two additional pen names and own a publishing house—I do the marketing for all of it. I also own multiple businesses offering a wide range of author services including… • LitRing – author promotions including group promos, book launch packages, managed ads for Facebook and BookBub, marketing makeovers, and a lot more • Novel Publicity – everything authors need for editing, formatting, and marketing their books • Your Author Engine – training courses for authors, heavy on the marketing • Sweet Promise Press – small press with emphasis on cozy mysteries and sweet romance 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest struggle was probably my success as a marketer. I started my author career right around the same time I started Novel Publicity and my success as a marketer pretty much overshadowed any attempts I had to really push my author brand. 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

I’m still learning about my readers, and I’m always researching to try to get better in touch with them. There are still times where risks I take don’t pan out, so it’s constantly a learning experience. Things really clicked around 2008, the same time I started venturing out and attending industry conferences. That’s a great way to force yourself to learn how to explain your work in tight, powerful sentences!

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I love David Gaughran, Nicholas Erik, and Skye Warren’s newsletters for authors. I also regularly use Amazon Publishing Rocket (for keywords), Connectio (for FB ads), BookBrush (for ad design), Upviral and Gleam (for giveaways), and ActiveCampaign (for newsletters).

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Do it first or do it best (rather than trying to do it all). Seriously, I say it all the time!

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

I write sweet women’s fiction as Melissa Storm, cozy mysteries as Molly Fitz, and most recently, Sweet Paranormal as the co-author pen name Mila Riggs.

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I wouldn’t chase all those shiny, new ideas so often. A lot of the work I had to do to really get my career moving was all about refocusing my brand and getting things back into nice, neat, little boxes.

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

Before everything in the world got turned upside down, I used the Amazon pre-order system to push me to hit my deadlines. However, now with a homeschooler and much more noise than ever at home while I write, it’s a crazy free-for-all.

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer), but I was also picked up by a publishing house that did everything

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

2017 was the year when things really started to take off. I hired my virtual assistant, Angi, who has proven to be an integral part of all of my businesses, and then continued to build my team with smart, trustworthy people. I’d been doing everything myself for far too long. By delegating, I was finally able to start giving my writing career the same TLC I’d always given my marketing one. That was also the year I first made the USA Today bestseller list and that Amazon offered me a Kindle Worlds series based on my First Street Church series. (Although that Amazon program is no longer available, I did keep the rights to my books.) That is also the year I started the Your Author Engine courses to help authors with their marketing efforts. Who knew I would love teaching marketing every bit as much as I love doing it? 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I took a really big risk by doing a big marketing push to try to hit the USA Today Bestseller list and that big risk started leading to some really big results.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” – Theodore Roosevelt

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Amazon also-boughts say a lot about who’s buying your book. If the books listed in yours are very dissimilar to your own, then you’ve got a problem and need to revisit your brand. This is why I’ve found it very important to have a different pen name for each genre you want to write in.

What else would you like to share with readers?

If you don’t see a service offered on one of my business websites, ask about it! My team possesses a wide range of skills and we’re always ready to help authors in any way that we can.

 

Kasie Whitener

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I have been in the writer network in South Carolina for a long time. I made the South Carolina Council on the Humanities Speaker’s Bureau in 2013 and have delivered workshops for nonprofit organizations and civic communities through that channel. I pitched and was accepted to deliver a workshop on writing funeral scenes at Bowling Green’s Winter Wheat Festival. All while After December was being refined and queried. The weekly tweet chat, #wschat, became mine in 2014 and I’ve curated hundreds of one-hour sessions on Twitter to engage writers in discussion around the craft. In 2018, I asked our local talk radio station to let me host a weekly show about writing and we’ll deliver our 100th episode in June 2020. Curating resources for writers is a passion for me so I joined the Board of Directors for the South Carolina Writers Association in the role of Vice President Events & Education. I continue to find ways to educate writers including adding a special seminar on the Business of Writing to my vitae at the University of South Carolina. In everything, I want to bring practical, usable instruction to writers who, like me, may have come to authorhood as a second career. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

Despite establishing a great network and a strong social media presence, I didn’t have a product — a book! — to market. So when it came time to tell people about the book, I was behind the curve. I didn’t have an email subscribers list. I planned to primarily sell my book through events and instruction. Then COVID-19 hit and all of the events I had scheduled were either canceled or moved online. I struggled for a while finding my voice (I have multiple blogs) and deciding how much of myself I wanted to reveal in my marketing efforts. I also needed branding which should have evolved out of my voice but I couldn’t really decide who I wanted to present to the world. Then I turned 40. It felt like all bets were off. Be Yourself became my new motto and who I am is Unapologetically X. That brand opened something for me, helped me have courage to write about politics on my website and wrap my brand around my characters’ experience of coming-of-age in the 90s. A lot of writers hide behind their work but I wanted to burst forth through mine. It’s challenging, it’s gritty, and it’s X. And so am I. And some people won’t like that. Which is fine. So another struggle I’ve had has been really finding my target market — my ideal reader — and being comfortable with the fact that it won’t be everyone. Some people (old men, looking at you) won’t get me. And that’s got to be okay. To be authentic, I have to be brave enough to let the haters go.

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

Weirdly, one of my earliest beta readers told me who my target market was back in 2015. I should have then cultivated that market, but I don’t think I knew what to say to them. Even now, I doubt how many of us there are. Rebels, irreverent, a little dirty, the “like mes” out there have been hiding their true colors for a long time.

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I like live events that are not about your book. So we did a book store signing event where we talked about love in modern fiction. It was Valentine’s Day, so a perfect topic. And then we alluded to our own books and how we handled the topic. Very different books, different genres, and different approaches. But me and my co-host enjoyed the conversation and the people who attended it seemed to enjoy it, too. I have spoken at library events, book club conferences, and done entrepreneurial webinars. Usually my book is a background piece: give people something they can use, not just a sales pitch. I have also enjoyed the Teddy Ruxpin’s Book Club YouTube channel videos I’ve been making that supplement the book. Not sure how much others love them (I haven’t really marketed them yet) but I like behind-the-scenes stuff when I love a book so I built some for my readers.

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Content is king. The more you can show what you know, teach others usable skills, or add to the discussion, the more you are contributing to the industry, not just selling something.

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Literary Fiction — character-driven stories with a GenX (growing up in the 80s and 90s) bent

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would have built the email list earlier. In all the events I delivered, I could have had hundreds of readers. I mistakenly thought I had nothing to say.

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

While writing, I typically use word counts. Daily or weekly. When revising it’s about segments of the book and calendaring specific hours to spend just in revision. I workshop a lot of my scenes for the benefit of reading them out loud and getting feedback. Unfortunately my workshop is not my target market, so their feedback can have its limits. But needing to have pages ready for group twice a month is a very effective deadline.

How did you publish your book?

I was picked up by a publishing house that did everything. 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

There was a good push when the book was released, a lot of followers who had been waiting to see a finished product. My plan has been one event per month, one email to subscribers with new content, and growing the radio show’s listener base with the idea that those listeners would read my book, too.

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I think longevity is the name of the game. We are in a binge-read society right now. When people discover you, there should be a lot of content for them to binge read. I know it’ll probably be the second and third books that really sell the first one. So I’m playing the long game with my platform. Get them engaged and deliver small content units (videos, blogs, webinars) to keep them engaged until the next book is ready.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“Never let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game.” Babe Ruth

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

I love Twitter for finding an audience. The use of hashtags is the easiest market research you can do. Go find the tags that match your message and see who else is using them. Then go find the people who talk about the stuff that matches your book and participate in their conversations with their hashtags. Give them love — like, retweet, reply, and comment on their messages. Help them get traction and they’ll help you, too. Don’t waste your time marketing to other writers. You want readers and while it’s true a lot of writers are good readers, they’re also preoccupied with promoting their own work.

What else would you like to share with readers?

Authors who become Patrons of the radio show (patreon.com/WriteOnSC) can get interviews posted on our website, mentions of their books, and shout-outs on social channels. We also give Patrons exclusive content like behind-the-scenes and specific tools they can use.

 

Natasha Carlow

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I am a first-time author, a blogger, and a contributing writer for a few publications, including Pregnancy after Loss Support. I am also a certified grief and loss counselor working diligently within my community to help loss-parents feel less alone. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest struggle was finding the courage to talk about myself. Everything I said felt like self-promotion, and I was always told that that was a very bad thing. I had to learn to separate myself from my book and it’s the message. I am not promoting myself (not that there is anything wrong with that) rather, I am sharing a message with other women like myself. To have experienced what I did and stay silent, when many families are struggling in silence, would be a greater sin.

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

I am still learning and understanding my target audience. I knew that I was writing to loss families, what I was surprised to learn is that there was a whole other target audience – people of colour, who are looking for representation. They are looking for characters their children could identify with. And I could have easily missed that, if I was not paying attention to who was reaching out to me or purchasing my book. This is another reason why marketing yourself and being present where your audience is, is so important.

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I use mostly social media to share about my book. Reaching out to groups or other people in your desired community helped a lot. I have used opportunities to write for magazines, write for guest blogs and any other publications catering to the desired audience.

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

People cannot buy your book if they have never heard of you. You need to speak to as many people as you can about your subject. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Children’s Literature

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would not miss an opportunity to share about my book. Not only is it a missed opportunity in terms of dollars and cents but knowing the bonds I have formed with my readers, there were opportunities to create new relationships that were missed.

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

I am still pretty old school. I simply write everything down in my planner. Every week/day, I take a look at what is coming up and I organize my week/day accordingly. I leave myself little reminders of upcoming deadlines and reward myself for meeting deadlines early. But most importantly I remind myself of how lucky I am to be able to have a deadline to look forward to. Many people aspire to achieve the goal that I have and that is a wonderful blessing.

How did you publish your book?

I hired a company to take care of everything for me. 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

I have only been a published author for one year but I am seeing steady improvements in my returns. Every time I see and improvement, I want to do challenge myself to do better the nest time around but I am always reminding myself that this is a journey,  not a sprint.

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

Having a strong team working with you was crucial. I could not do this alone. No matter how great you are at marketing yourself, you will still miss an email or an opportunity. Having a team means there are other people working on your behalf, seeing opportunities that you may genuinely miss.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“You have to write the book that wants to be written. And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups, then you write it for children.” Madeleine L’Engle

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Follow the chatter. I learned so much about the grief and loss community by joining Facebook groups and consuming the conversation. Sometimes I was vocal, sometimes I was not but I was always listening. Similarly, when I wanted to become an author, I joined groups, platforms about being an author – from the very specific groups like those for Caribbean children’s book authors, to the general author groups. Some were more beneficial than others, some were not beneficial at all. But I listened and I learned new things by following the conversations contained in each group.

What else would you like to share with readers?

I love doing book reviews for new authors. I love seeing another person’s vision come to life and I am excited to share all that I have learned from that person’s point of view.

 

Kirsten Oliphant

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I’ve been hosting the Create If Writing podcast for five years and am a sought-after speaker. For several years running, I’ve  been named one of Houston’s Top 25 Social Media Power Influencers. I offer monthly paid workshops, coaching, and lots of free resources through my podcast, website, and free Facebook group. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest struggle was mindset. I wanted to write books and have them sell. I didn’t want to focus my time on marketing and selling. I wanted to be a creative. Once I realized that marketing is really just connecting with my ideal readers, things became a lot easier and way more fun. It was also hard starting out with no money, bootstrapping everything from covers to ads. 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

It took a few months of really writing, marketing, and hanging out in the online space alongside other authors to realize where I was making missteps and how to clarify my efforts. I’m still learning! And the market continues to evolve. 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I love KDSpy and the genre reports from K-Lytics. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Spend time learning your genre and studying Amazon’s categories. Really know the books that are doing well in your genre, get close to any of the authors that you can in Facebook groups to learn from them, and READ. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

clean romance, nonfiction, YA urban fantasy

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would be much more clear about knowing the market before putting out a book. I would base my decisions on what sells, not what I like. 

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

I’m not really a systems girl. 

How did you publish your book?

I did everything on my own.

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

Six months.    

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I really planned and wrote a book to market. 

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

Don’t put limits on what you think you are capable of. Let yourself be surprised and amazing by what you can accomplish! 

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Writing to Market and Writing to Trend

What else would you like to share with readers?

http://createifwriting.com/workshops

 

Roshanda Pratt

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

In 2017, I wrote and published my first book about how businesses can use live video to connect and convert their live audience. Interestingly, I used live video to heavily market the book and still do today. I am a storyteller and live stream strategist. My background in television media, marketing and branding afforded me the opportunity to get my book in the hands of team leaders, brands and other coaches and consultants. I essentially modeled what I wrote in my book about using live video to build impact, influence and income.

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

The biggest struggle I think for many authors is using media to get more eyes on your book. How do you separate your book or standout from other authors? This can be overwhelming and frustrating if you do not have a plan. 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

Honestly, not long because the book was written to answer the questions I constantly received in email and on social media. 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I love to educate. In fact, that is one of the videos data shows people like. Educate your readers to the sale. Educate them on ideas or concepts from the book. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

I hosted a virtual book signing. I taught from my book and had a PayPal link so people could buy. I had another person monitoring it and, when someone purchased, I thanked them live on my video and signed their book on the spot. People loved it. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

non-fiction

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

Early on in the publishing process, I would have connected to more influencers with communities where my book could help solve their problem of going live beyond just going live. 

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

Accountability. I had someone checking in and making sure I meet those deadlines/goals.

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer). 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

It took months of being consistent and you don’t stop. 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I believe a strong and consistent message helped. 

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“I got my start by giving myself a start!” Madam C. J. Walker

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Of course, live video! This is a great way to position yourself as an authority. The book is an extension of your expertise. When speaking of your book, go beyond the surface of it is a good book. People want value. Showcase the value or the why of the book. People buy the why. 

What else would you like to share with readers?

I can support authors in creating a clear and concise marketing message for live video and traditional media. I can help authors understand how to make their book an extension of their expertise and how to build impact, influence and income on line and on air.

Annalisa Parent

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I am a writing coach. I help authors get over writers block and fear to finish their books, publish traditionally, and live the author lifestyle. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

It takes a while to get your name out into the marketplace. When you’re “nobody” at the beginning, it can feel like you’re constantly speaking into the void. These are the moments when showing up and staying consistent are difficult. 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

I am a writing coach who wrote a book about how to write a book, so I came into this particular book with a lot of knowledge about my ideal reader. It’s also something I teach me clients to do, so I probably had a leg up on this one as far as how to approach the work of thinking about my ideal audience. 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I love Social Jukebox. Think old fashioned jukebox where it plays songs at random, but for your social media posts. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Be yourself. It’s so cliche. But, look, it’s true. So many marketers make the mistake of trying to BE something. Just be you. The people who are attracted to that will be your loyal fans. The people who aren’t weren’t meant to be. There’s another book and author out there for them to love. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

I help fiction writers to publish and sell their books. I have published poetry, teleplays, screenplays, fiction, and was a member of the White House press pool.

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I wish my book had gone through 2 copy editors, as there are still many errors in the first edition. My editor loved my book–which was great for my confidence–but she overlooked some errors in the copyedit that I wish had been caught before publication. 

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

I am big on time management. I teach my clients how to budget their time so they know how they are spending it. This way it doesn’t slip away or down the rabbit holes of reading your facebook wall for hours or lost on “I’ve always wondered…” google searches. 

How did you publish your book?

I was picked up by a publishing house that did everything. 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

It was fairly instantaneous as a trickle, and now is a steady flow. 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

Persistence. Show up everyday. Do the facebook live when no one’s watching. Tweet into the empty void. Keep on keepin’ on. Oh yeah, and provide VALUE to your audience. No one wants to hear about me me me or Buy my book. Be someone you’d like to hang out with–and people will come hang out with you. 

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

Writers write. (As in, it’s that simple.)   

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

The knowledge that no matter how awesome your book is, and I’m sure it’s awesome, it’s still not for “everyone” The more you can niche your market, the better. This seems counterintuitive to most writers. We *think* that having a book targeted to everyone will sell better. In fact, a book targeted to everyone will sell to no one. When you think about your ideal reader, get as specific as possible. You’ll have fewer headaches in your marketing strategy, and ultimately sell more books. I promise. 

What else would you like to share with readers?

If you’re serious about living the author lifestyle and putting in the time and investment to do it, I offer a free consultation to talk about where you are and where you’d like to go and how you can get there. www.datewiththemuse.com/publishnow

Eva Lesko Natiello

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I have 20+ years of experience in PR, marketing and branding to coach authors on self-publishing and book marketing. I am the creator and facilitator of Self-Publish Like a Pro and Find Your Readers Book Marketing Workshops. My articles on writing, publishing and book marketing appear in the Huffington Post. I am  thrilled to empower authors to be successful, dynamic authorpreneurs, while helping them to create greater visibility for their books. I am a former VP of Global Communications for Estee Lauder Inc. I’m also  a member of Authors Guild and International Thriller Writers. My next thriller is forthcoming.

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest struggle was getting my book noticed. When you self-publish a book, you don’t have a PR team, Sales team or Marketing team. I had to figure out how to leverage the benefits of being an indie to create visibility for my book.

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

I understood my ideal reader right away. My first book is a psychological thriller and I knew that they are always on the hunt for the next thrilling read. I had a great list of comp books which helped me direct my marketing efforts.

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I don’t have tools exactly, but I do rely on my book’s comp title list A LOT. This is the one chore (besides writing a synopsis for my book) which I dreaded doing. I didn’t realize at the time all the benefits a list of books similar to my own, would provide. Especially marketing. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Start your marketing efforts in your own community. Strive to be a rockstar in your own community, and if you achieve that you’ll move on to a larger landscape with fans who’ll champion your efforts. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Psychological thriller/suspense

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would start my marketing efforts well in advance of the book launch.

 

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer). 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

2 months

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

PR, book bloggers, price promotions, marketing

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

Marketing is exercising the power you have to help readers find their next book. By making sure it just happens to be yours.

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

If you don’t know where to position your book, create a list of comp titles (books that are comparable to yours) and look to see how they have positioned theirs. 

What else would you like to share with readers?

Appearances are everything. Starting with your book cover, through to your retail sales pages and continuing on to your website and social media pages. Make sure they are professional and maximize all of your points of difference to attract readers and boost sales.

Angela Applewhite

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I write fiction. Romantic Suspense novels and short stories. I published my first book, Torn: A Forensic Romance in November 2018. On the 23rd the book went live with no marketing plan, no email list, and no idea that it was already on the market–I’d forgotten to change the launch date on IngramSpark. The wrong version went live. Though I was worried about what my blunder would do to the book sales, I had a beautiful book cover, designed by Jessica Bell, and a slick professionally designed website done by Studio1Designs, a Facebook page, Goodreads and a Twitter account. Within the Indigo website, my cover image was missing and I really wanted to see my book in the local brick and mortar stores. Mid-December, I contacted the Associate Category Manager, Local Authors – Western Canada at Indigo regarding their consignment program for Indie authors. He pointed out that since Torn with Ingram was ‘short discount’ (36% to retailers and no-returnable), I would only be able to get the boo into stores using consignment and that had a list of issues I needed to consider and deal with. However, he requested that I send my cover image and he would make sure that it showed up online. I asked if there was another way other than consignment to have my book on the physical shelves. He suggested a wholesale discount change to 55% and the USD and CAD prices. I then needed to send an outline of my (non-existent) marketing plan to regional buying manager for Central and Eastern Canada. I created a plan and did just that. After the books were finally in the store, I stopped by one afternoon and the manager came out to speak to me. She suggested I sign the books. We took some impromptu photos. She place a “signed by author” sticker on them. I shied away from booking an official in-store signing because I didn’t think I had enough traction to generate interest. I worried that I would just sit there and no one would buy the book and I would be crushed. By the time I built the nerve to book a date, all the dates were taken. Despite my blunder and lack of a mailing list and a marketing plan, by the end of January, the book sold relatively well within the 3 months it was out. I had Christmas on my side, I guess. I stumble my way through a facebook ad and got some traffic to my website. I got editorial reviews from Ella James Books and IndieReader. I joined a LitRing free promo and started a real mailing list. I hired Novelpublicity for marketing services and got some help with my newsletter and social media from an experience author. I conducted tons (by my standards) of research marketing as a new indie author. I left bookmarks everywhere: airports, airplanes, on the tables in mall food courts. I handed them to sale clerks. I got my friends to hand them out. I gave away books to strangers. I spent some stupid money on Bookbub and with another Author/marketer (no names). I ran ads on Just Romantic Suspense. Really reasonable pricing. Recently I guest-blogged on this site as well. I bought Mark Dawson’s marketing course and worked through that, learning how to create FB ads, write book blurbs, and some other helpful stuff. I found and signed up for WIP. I was introduced to authors and influencers in the business with good advice. Angela Ford and Bublish to name a couple. I’m still working up the nerve to contact Brooke Warner. I read her “Write On, Sisters!” book and felt like she was taIking to me. In April of 2019, I got the opportunity to place Torn in 2 major bookstores in Barbados. By that I mean I contacted them and stated a case they couldn’t refuse. Days Books took 5 books on consignment. Pages took 15. A week later my husband was travelling there for a conference. I set up an in-store signing. We all went together for a week. I took 60 books with me. I placed an ad in the local newspaper. Through connections, I got on a popular early morning talk show before the signing. At the signing, the store sold out of books and bought all that I had with me and sold those as well. Then they order another batch for their 3 stores. Torn was a top seller in Pages for a few months. Both stores have re-order 3 times. The paperback sales for Torn in Barbados slowed in the last few months, both Pages and Days Books are asking for my second book. “Twist of Fate”, which I launched on May 7, 2020. It’s a couple of short stories. I released it in ebook format on Amazon, Kobo and iBooks (iTunes), then I added the paperback on Amazon only. I didn’t go with an Ingram distribution because I wanted more control. I did however distributed with PublishDrive. I was wiser this time and started a 2-week lead-up launch with ads, pre-order, facebook and Instagram sneak peeks, guest blogging, and newsletter teasers to my mailing list (now 326).

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest struggles in marketing are not having a mailing list, not knowing where or how to find my audience, figuring out which ‘marketers’ were there to help and which ones were taking advantage. 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

I’m still learning. I still have to figure out what excites them and entices them to buy.

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

Author’s website, Guestblogging, Bookfunnel, StoryOrigin, Facebook and Instagram,

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Connect as much as you can and do it early. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Romantic suspense

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

Engage more. 

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

A spreadsheet. 

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer). 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

I’m not there yet but I’ve seen growth thanks to my marketing efforts thus far. 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I still maintain that connection to the community and a mailing list is best. I’m finding that out more as I go.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“Our scars make us know that our past was for real.” Jane Austen

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Talk to connections at the bookstores. Other authors in the genre.

Nancy Cavillones

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I became a virtual assistant in 2016 to create a more flexible work-life schedule. I got my start in author support as a member of the Write Publish Sell team, headed up by founder Alexa Bigwarfe, with whom I still work to this day. I discovered that working with authors was fulfilling and meaningful creative work, and I pivoted to signing on solely with indie authors in 2019. My strengths are helping authors navigate tech solutions for platform growth, and acting as a sounding board for marketing strategies.

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

Time! Marketing your own book requires making it a priority over other activities and work. 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

BookFunnel is a great way to build your list and get your book into the hands of new readers. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Be authentic and be people-forward. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Non-fiction, for now. A sci fi novel is coming someday. The authors I support write self-help, memoirs and non-fiction. 

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I’ve learned that book marketing is a long game and that building relationships is the key to getting your book out there. 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

I’m old fashioned, albeit in a digital way. I use a calendar and a to do list. 

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer). 

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“Se Hace Camino Al Andar / You Make The Way By Walking” – Antonio Machado

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Book retailers will always be the best place to start figuring out how to position your book. On Amazon, you can look for comparable titles and see what other titles readers have purchased. 

What else would you like to share with readers?

Starting your marketing early and intentionally! I help authors implement marketing plans, so I strongly suggest you invest in a professionally created marketing strategy. Otherwise, you’ll end up cobbling together bits and pieces of marketing activities with no clear way forward. 

Na'ima Robert

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I’ve been in the publishing industry for ten years and have owned my own business for seven years. During this time, I’ve worked on hundreds of books and have launched best sellers for my clients. My services include: editing, coaching, self-publishing guidance, book marketing, book launches, web design, and writing mentorships. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

I had so many questions with little to no answers. Because I was on my own with my business in 2013, I didn’t have anyone I could shoot questions to. So I spent loads of time reading books and articles, watching videos and courses, and experimenting. I made lots of mistakes, but they always taught me something. In 2014, I became part of a group called 30 Days of Hustle by New York Times best-selling author Jon Acuff. Once I found my tribe, things really took off. Another struggle I dealt with was target marketing. In the beginning, my blog posts were geared toward editors, not new authors. I had no idea until I hired a brand marketer in late 2014. Once he made that clear for me, I was able to adjust my copywriting and position myself as someone who was there to help authors hold their books in their hands.

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

Honestly, probably 6 months after working with my brand marketer. But I think I’m always learning more about my target market. It evolves. Things change. People need different things, and you have to know their needs before they realize what they are. 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

These books: https://shaylaraquel.com/shaylas-picks My favorite newsletters that offer fantastic marketing advice are Reedsy, Jane Friedman’s The Hot Sheet, and Gary Vaynerchuk. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Practice authenticity first and foremost. It is the foundation of everything you will do when marketing your book and branding yourself as an author. If you aren’t yourself, then you’re wasting your time.

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

I work on fiction and nonfiction. It’s easier to list the books I don’t work on, which can be found here: https://shaylaraquel.com/faqs

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would’ve invested into a brand marketer way sooner. I put it off because of the cost. Looking back, I would’ve made more money if I had hired him. In fact, after hiring him, I had a 35% profit increase in one quarter.

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer). 

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

That’s a loaded question. In reality, it probably took three years to see my company truly take off. In fact, three years after I started my business, I was able to buy my first house. No one likes that answer though because it sounds like it’ll take forever. Well, honey, I’m in it for the long game. 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

That’s tough. If you’re going to make me pick just one thing and nothing else, then I’ll say God’s grace.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live in the world they’ve been given, than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.” Muhammad Ali

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

The best places to start are my blog, my #1 best-selling book, and my how-to videos: Blog: https://shaylaraquel.com/blog Book: https://shaylaraquel.com/10commandments How-to videos: https://shaylaraquel.com/howtovideos These are also some of my favorite books on writing, marketing, and the like: https://shaylaraquel.com/shaylas-picks For positioning your book, the only way you’re going to truly understand where your book will get the most visibility and engagement is to understand what problem your book solves and where people “hang out” with those problems. For example, if your book is targeted toward Gen X-ers who are reentering the workforce now that their kids are more grown up, get on LinkedIn and write helpful articles on the topic. If your book is targeted toward Millennials who want to get in shape, then post 1-minute videos on Instagram to teach them simple ways to improve their health. Solve their problems!

What else would you like to share with readers?

I teach workshops and am available here: https://shaylaraquel.com/speaking

 

Amy Collins

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I wrote my first self-help book for Adams Media (Now S&S) in 2003. After almost 30 years as a book buyer, book sales rep, and book marketer, I now spend my days helping authors grow their platform and connect with readers. I published my last three books on my own under my own imprint.

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest issue when I first got started was the “impostor” syndrome. I had to force myself to promote and to ask for attention. It was SUCH a foreign concept for my little, New Englandy brain. I hoped people would just find me and my books without me having to ask for attention. It was the hardest thing to overcome. I was afraid all the time of what “people would think.”

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

Once I started to research? 3 hours. But it took me 5 years to stop ASSUMING I KNEW my readers and actually DO the research. When I was younger, I was guilty of believing everything I thought. I did not believe I had to research the market, I  would just be able to use my own experiences to understand my target audience. NOPE! So glad I got over that.

 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

Your best resource is successful authors and publishers that publish into your genre. Use what they are doing and sharing to become a more educated, knowledgeable author and promoter. Bloggers, reviewers, tools, ads, contests…. what are the successful authors doing? Where are they hanging out?

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Other authors are not your competition, they are your community. GET OUT THERE and join in the conversation with your community.

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Self help, business, non-fiction

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

I would ask for what I wanted each and every day. I would ask in spite of what I felt.

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

Desperation, fear of public humiliation, caffeine, and Microsoft Outlook Calendar/Tasks

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer).

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

90 days before I started seeing ANY real results. 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I did not ask early enough or often enough. I needed to reach out to more people earlier.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

It does not matter how you feel. Do “it” anyway. Actions come before feelings, not the other way around.

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

I pore over the bestseller lists every few days. And NOT just on Amazon! Look at Indie lists, USA TODAY, watch publishers marketplace and subscribe to Shelf-Awareness to see what big books are releasing, how they are being received, and how THEY are positioned.

What else would you like to share with readers?

New Shelves focuses on the market and distribution. If you have any questions or want to learn more about bookstores, libraries, marketing and book sales, please go to our site.

Shelly Longenecker

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I consider myself more of an entrepreneur than an author. I use writing as a part of my overall marketing plan. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

Definitely establishing my brand. 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

I understood my target market before I started my business and wrote my book. Because I had lived this life for 5 years prior to writing about it or making a business about it. I lived it. My friends lived it. I intimately understood it. 

 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

I use Alexa for occasional marketing consults. I have a SMM that helps me guide the overall marketing plan for my business. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

This is hard because I have several. I guess if I have to pick one, it has to be boring. Have a plan. Seriously. This is boring I know. But, you need a plan. Then you need to work the plan. Without this, your efforts will be stilted. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Budgeting and healthy eating. 

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

This one is easy! I would have launched my business and brand 1st. Grown and audience and then launched my book. I made the mistake of launching both my biz and my book on the same day. Don’t do that! HA! 

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

BGP – Big Girl Panties. It’s a really formal and official strategy. I get them, use them, size up, and repeat. Over and over. True story. 

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer).

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

I don’t know that I have ever seen BIG results. But, I do see results consistently. I track my metrics monthly. If I don’t see results in those sessions from my efforts of the previous month, I tweak my future efforts. 

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

I have extreme clarity and laser focus. I think this is my greatest strength in my business. 

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“It’s time to pull up your big girl panties” Not joking – I say that to myself all the time. If that’s too *much*, I also like this one “Time is the currency of your future” That’s also my quote. “The results your craving are in the work you’re avoiding” Krista Lockwood. 

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Alexa is my tool – ha ha ha. 

 

Angela J Ford

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

My author career began in 2015 when I published my first epic fantasy novel, The Five Warriors. I spent three years doing marketing for small business owners and entrepreneurs to help me understand digital marketing and get an inside view of how nonfiction authors launched their books. Once I began marketing my own fantasy novel, I learned a lot about the nuances of self-publishing and how much easier it was to market to fiction readers versus nonfiction readers. 

Think back to when you were a new author. What were your biggest struggles with marketing?

My biggest struggle was getting visible in front of my target audience and getting more reviews.

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

This is a tricky question, because I am my own ideal audience. I read fantasy and I write fantasy, I usually buy ebooks on Amazon, I’m enrolled in Kindle Unlimited and I’m a part of several groups where I can discuss books and get recommendations. While understanding my target audience was key, I had to work hard at making my books visible to them.

 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

My favorite marketing tool right now is StoryOrigin. It allows me to schedule my email campaigns, do cross promos, newsletter swaps and manage my ARC team all in one place. 

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

Start. Now. Oftentimes we wait for everything to be perfect before we get started but you’ll learn so much when you begin, so start now. 

What genre(s) do you serve or write in?

Fantasy

What is the ONE thing you would do differently, knowing what you know now?

Focus more on list building and reaching my target audience.

 

What sort of system did you use to make sure you hit your deadlines?

I adore covers, so once I have a book cover I am extra motivated to publish the book. To help me reach my deadlines, I often go ahead and book an editor. Knowing they are waiting on me helps me to meet my writing goals. 

How did you publish your book?

I self-published with the help of freelancers (editor, cover designer).

How long would you say it really took you to start seeing big results from your marketing efforts?

It took me three years to break even on all my books. Once I finished my first epic fantasy series, I bundled them as a box set. I spent around $10,000 on expenses and marketing the box set and ended up with a profit of $50,000 for the year.

Is there any ONE factor that you think contributed to that?

Listening to successful authors and being willing to take risks.

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

“If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” African Proverb

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Yes – go to Amazon and take a look at the bestselling books in your genre. What do the covers look like? The blurb? What do you need to do to ensure your book is similar to the bestsellers? And if you need help, reach out to successful authors in your genre and ask for recommendations. 

What else would you like to share with readers?

I build beautiful websites and landing pages for authors. Oftentimes I come across an author website that is hard to navigate, does not work on smartphones, and it is difficult to find the author’s books or even sign up for their email list! I take the guesswork and technical headache out of platform building and give authors a website they will be proud to send readers to.

Raewyn Sangari

Raewyn Sangari

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Tell us a little bit about your author career, your marketing, and/or other services you offer. 

I offer several levels of Instagram strategy and management. My most popular package is a book launch special. With a special strategy focused on launching your book successfully, I take Instagram off of your plate during your busiest time! Launch week festivities are crucial! 

 

How long did it take you to really understand your target audience / ideal reader?

It took me quite a long time, actually! I sort of fell into being a virtual assistant and resisted seeking out my ideal client, instead focusing on the tasks that I enjoy doing. It wasn’t until my 3rd year of my business did I realize who I wanted to work with. 

 

Do you have any favorite tools or resources to help you market?

Later.com and Tailwind

What is your absolute favorite marketing tip?

You don’t have to post on Instagram every single day, but you need to be connecting with your followers.

 

What’s your favorite inspirational quote?

We develop in the chaos. We develop in the messiness and the imperfections are actually what is beautiful about each of us. It’s what makes us unique.

Do you have any tools, resources to help people determine how / where to position their book?

Yes! I have an author strategy Trello board. 

What else would you like to share with readers?

I also offer an author landing page on IG. We make your Instagram feed look like a website with all the most important book information. Learn more at https://www.raewynsangari.com/just-market-it

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